Sangtar Da Toomba | Toombi Part 3

Sangtar Da Toomba | Toombi Part 3

In this lesson, you will learn how notes are relative to Toombi’s size. Sangtar plays notes of Charukeshi Thaat to demonstrate the possibilities of bigger size instruments. © 2014 Plasma Records. http://www.sangtar.com or http://www.youtube.com/user/sangtarheer

Bansuri – Part 6 – Playing Half Notes

Bansuri – Part 6 – Playing Half Notes
In this lesson, you will learn to play half notes on a Bansuri (Indian Flute). With this method bansuri becomes capable of playing all twelve notes of an octave. To view English Subtitles please use the ‘CC’ option. Thanks. © 2012 Plasma Records.

Bansuri – Part 5 – Playing Scales with Key Change – Practical

Bansuri – Part 5 – Playing Scales with Key Change – Practical
In this lesson, you will learn to play seven modes or scales or moorshanas, and six thaats of Northern Indian music on a Bansuri (Indian Flute). The bansuri is capable of playing these scales without using half notes. For detailed explanation please see ‘part 4’ from the same series. To view English Subtitles please use the ‘CC’ option.

Bansuri – Part 4 – Playing Scales with Key Change – Theory

Bansuri – Part 4 – Playing Scales with Key Change – Theory
In this lesson, you will learn to play seven modes or scales or moorshanas, and six thaats of Northern Indian music on a Bansuri (Indian Flute). Bansuri is capable of playing these scales without using half notes. To view English Subtitles please use the ‘CC’ option.

Bansuri – Part 3 – Playing Natural Scale

Bansuri – Part 3 – Playing Natural Scale
In this basic lesson, you will learn to play a natural scale on bamboo flute. To view English Subtitles please use the ‘CC’ option

Toombi – Part 2 – Playing First Four Notes

Toombi: Playing First Four Notes
Please watch the video below. In this Video you will learn to play first four notes on a Toombi. If you do not understand Punjabi, you may use the Close Captioning (‘CC’) feature on YouTube. Also for further description, please visit youtube.com/sangtarheer. Thanks

Toombi – Part 1 – How to Hold and Play

Toombi: Introduction and General Information.
Please watch the video below to learn the basic hand positions and how to play a Toombi. If you do not understand Punjabi, you may use the Close Captioning (‘CC’) feature on YouTube.

Bansuri – Part 2 – How to Hold and Position

Introduction and General Information about Flutes:
Please watch the video below to learn the basic hand positions and how to blow into a bansuri. If you do not understand Punjabi, you may use the Close Captioning (‘CC’) feature on YouTube.

Bansuri – Part 1 – Basics

NOTE: You may see the entire series of lessons here.
Introduction and General Information about Flutes:
Please watch the video below to have a general idea about the instrument. If you do not understand Punjabi, you may use the Close Captioning (‘CC’) feature on YouTube. I have also included the English transcript below the video.

Today we’ll talk about flutes. Basically, there are two types of flutes, straight flutes and side flutes.
The straight flutes such as this penny whistle, have a mouth piece like this, and these are played holding like this. Our Algozay is also another example of these.

And the side flute, like this one, these we hold on to a side to play. And, these have a blow-hole like this one right here. I’ll show you a few examples.
First of all, I have , no examples of straight flutes. First is this Penny Whistle. It is played like this

[music]

Another example of a straight flute is this Chinese flute. You’ll see that in any straight flute, there is always a hole after the mouthpiece like this one and it is always cut on an sharp angle. So it becomes the same thing,
as we blow on an angle on this side flute, The sharp cut makes our straight blow hit the edge. When the air we blow hits the edge, it goes in and out rapidly and flutters. The sound of flute is not created by our blown air. Flute already has air in it. Our blowing just gives it a push to vibrate. Our blown air itself doesn’t vibrate.

And, this is a Chinese fuke (air), I mean a flute. Of course in China it needs Chinese air to play. You may have heard its unique sound.

[music]

And, the third example of the straight flutes are these Algozas. Because it is a folk instrument, so the makers normally drill the holes without any precision, and generally these are out of tune. As you see these Bansuries.
These holes have been drilled according to the laws of physics, with mathematically precision. But as you see on these Algozas, all holes appear distributed equally. Having said that, Algozas sound really great when they are slightly, just slightly out of tune with each other. As you see here. You play these together by keeping rhythm in your blowing. For example

[music]

The second way to play these is holding the keynote on one and play the notes on the other. For example
[music]

Just like that.

Now the side flutes, I have two examples here. The first is this one, it is a standard orchestral flute (C).
Playing this is very similar to the Indian Bansuri. Making sound out of it is a little easier than a bamboo flute
as it has a mouth piece.

[music]

That is the way to play it. And the Indian flute (Bansuri), we will also talk later in detail about how to play it or not. It is also capable of producing all the notes of an octave.
But its greatness is that, the other flutes sometimes play the notes rigidly like.

[plays]

But the Indian Bansuri can also play slide so that means it can mimic vocal.
That is its greatness. We will discuss it later in detail, for now it is played like this

[music]

Like that.
Later we talk about how to blow into it and how to play notes on it.
That would be for another time.

sangtar.com > Music Theory > Musical Instruments

Making Thaats with Tetrachords Part IV

In the last two posts we have learned to make 32 Thaats from 8 Tetrachords. Now here is an interactive movie to put them altogether. Study these three posts, find the pattern of note changes. Once you understand the sequence how notes are moving from natural to flats (and fourth sharp), it will never leave your memory again.

sangtar.com > Music Theory > Advanced Theory